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Garey Godson Has Tha Juice

Garey Godson

Garey Godson’s last single was the song “Private Trips.” I reviewed it here last month. The song is a fun and festive homage to the artist’s hometown of Lagos.

It painted a scene of carnivals, beautiful music and beautiful women. Despite a lack of foreknowledge or interest in Nigeria, by the time the last note of the song rang out, I was packing my bags.

“Tha Juice” is Garey’s new single, and it is a different take on the sounds of West Africa, and beyond. The beat moves from a standard Trap funk to a deep bass Dancehall rhythm.

Throughout the song, the arrangement is simple. Bright synth chords, distant in the mix, are the only accompaniment to the big beat set by the bass and drums. The aforementioned shift in genre occurs without and change in instrumentation, just a shift in rhythm. That’s impressive.

Lyrically the song is an ode to the hustle, or “The Juice.” Godson sings of his own history of working relentlessly toward his goals. He acknowledges his haters with the side-eyed comment, “Thank you for doubting me.”

Like “Private Trips,” “The Juice” looks to Garey’s home for inspiration. However, this is not the idealized version of Nigeria found in the first single. This time Godson sings about “where I come from,” when describing The Juice as a requirement, not an option.

It is a more serious song for Garey. “Tha Juice” is a bit of realism set to funky beat.



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Here is what Garey Godson says …

Garey Godson is a Nigerian born artist and Record producer based in Berlin, Germany. The best way to capture Godsons sound is Afro-Fusion, a blend of Afro-tunes with a mixture of Western influences. The rarity of Garey is seen in his progressive and versatile nature towards music. This is evident in the vast presentation of cultures represented in his sound and lifestyle.


His upcoming body of work ‘Still I Rise’ which features records like All I Ever, KoKo & Chosen One is heavily inspired by Maya Angelou as It is soulful, rhythmic and promotes ideas such as resiliency, self-love, strength, and beauty within the black communities in the diaspora and beyond.